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Mineral Supplement Linked to Dementia

The Telegraph newspaper recently reported on a study which found an increased risk of dementia in women taking calcium supplements, who have previously had a stroke.

“Patients who had survived a stroke were  seven times more likely to go on to develop dementia if they took the daily supplement, say scientists at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.”

Reassuringly, organic calcium found in food is perfectly safe. As Eve Kalinik advised in her recent blog for us: Mythbusting: Osteoporosis, there are plenty of food sources of calcium, as well as lifestyle changes, that can be taken by women seeking to reduce their risk of osteoporosis.

We know from our Mythbusting blog series that inorganic minerals found in tap water and supplements do not support health, cannot be absorbed by the body, and are therefore unnecessary – and according to the study the Telegraph reported on – downright dangerous, in some cases.

Neither mineral supplements, nor tap water, nor ‘remineralised’ water is useful to our bodies. All the minerals we need as humans can only be derived from food; plants convert inorganic minerals to organic, which the human body is capabable of asbsorbing and putting to use to protect our health.

Check out the rest of our Mythbusting blog series to learn more about minerals and health (we also tackle that other common myth, alkalinity). And read the Telegraph article here.

 

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